About TCM

(Traditional Chinese Medicine)

chinese-herbsTraditional Chinese Medicine views the human body and human health as more than the sum of it’s physical parts.  It emphasizes the wholeness of body, mind, and spirit and the unity of the individual with the natural environment.  TCM focuses on balance and harmony of the energy known as “Qu or Chi” within the body.  This energy is the force that traverses the body’s meridians, both along your skin and through your internal organs.

When Chi flows in balance and harmony, good health is maintained.  If something blocks Chi and the flow is interrupted, you become ill.  TCM puts preventative health and Chi balance at center stage.  If you want to stay healthy, your Yin and Yang must also remain in balance, which correspond to female and male entities.  Acupuncture, a key practice of TCM employs very slender needles, inserted into meridian points, to keep Chi flowing and to balance Yin and Yang for better health.

Items characterized as Yin are more passive and dark compared to Yang’s forthright well-lit, extroverted qualities.  When you undergo a medical exam based on the precepts of TCM, your entire appearance including the odors of your skin and breath, are analyzed;  the sound of your breath and voice are taken into account and the way your skin, pulse, and muscles feel are also evaluated.  By feeling your pulse in six different spots at three depths, TCM practitioners drawn conclusions about your Chi.

While Acupuncture is growing in popularity, TCM also utilizes:

Herbs:  a wide range of herbs have been used to improve health in China for thousands of years.

Qi-Gong:  a special TCM form of exercise that infuses physical activity with meditation, breath control and meditation to alter Chi.

Moxibustion:  the therapeutic burning of Chinese herbs on the skin.

Nutrition:  TCM practitioners frequently prescribe special diets to prevent illness including oriental food therapy.